Growing Tips
Mint

Mint

Mint is best planted in the spring as young plants, it is a vigorous plant and will spread all over if planted directed into the ground so it’s ideally suited to large pots filled with multi-purpose compost.  It requires plenty of water, especially during hot dry weather.  Plants will finish flowering in the summer, once this happens cut the flowered shoots back to 5cm above the surface of the compost.  Plant different varieties in different pots to avoid them losing their individual scent and flavour.  You can rejuvenate congested clumps by upturning your pots, removing the rootball, splitting it in half and repotting a portion in the same container with fresh compost.

Mint will die back over the winter period but can be picked between late spring and mid-autumn.  Pick regularly to keep plants compact and to ensure lots of new shoots.  Mint is best fresh but to ensure supply during winter months wash well, dry, chop and then freeze.

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Comments
David Hewett - 19th June 2019

My indoor mint plant does not look happy. It had some strange orange coloured fungus looking stuff growing on it which I have cut off. I will try a bigger pot with more potting mix and see if that helps plus give it a bit more water

Any suggestions

Hetty - 20th June 2019

Hi David, I’m sorry to hear your mint plant isn’t very happy at the moment. It sounds like your mint plant may have rust fungus. When you water mint it’s best to do early in the day so water has time to evaporate and to water at the base of the plant so water isn’t left on the leaves. Ensure the mint has plenty of light and air flow (isn’t in a corner or close to a wall) thinning your mint if it’s bushy will also help allow better air circulation that can dry out rust fungus. I hope your mint plant recovers.

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